Tag Archive | Pillars of Democracy

Commonwealth calls for withdrawal of military from Fiji’s govt

26 April 2013, London

1. The Commonwealth Ministerial Action Group (CMAG) held its thirty-ninth meeting in London on 26 April 2013.

2. The meeting was chaired by Hon Dr Dipu Moni, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Bangladesh. It was also attended by Senator the Hon Bob Carr, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Australia; Hon John Baird, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Canada; Hon A J Nicholson, Minister of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade of Jamaica; Hon Dr Abdul Samad Abdullah, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Maldives; Hon Dr Samura Kamara, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Sierra Leone; Hon Bernard K Membe, Minister for Foreign Affairs and International Co-operation of Tanzania; Hon Winston Dookeran, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Trinidad and Tobago; and Hon Nipake Edward Natapei, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs and External Trade of Vanuatu.

3. CMAG welcomed the recent adoption by Heads of Government, and signature by The Queen, Head of the Commonwealth, of the Charter of the Commonwealth, encapsulating the core values and principles of the Commonwealth. It noted that the Charter reaffirmed the Commonwealth’s commitment inter alia to democracy, human rights, the rule of law, separation of powers, freedom of expression, good governance, tolerance, respect and understanding and the role of civil society. As the custodian of the Commonwealth’s fundamental political values, the Group pledged to continue to promote these commonly agreed goals.

4. The Group reviewed developments in relation to the country currently on its formal agenda, Fiji.

Fiji

5. CMAG reiterated the Commonwealth’s unwavering solidarity with the people of Fiji, and CMAG’s commitment to Fiji’s reinstatement as a full member of the Commonwealth family, through the restoration of constitutional democracy, the rule of law and human rights, in accordance with the fundamental political values of the Commonwealth.

6. Ministers expressed their regret at the Government of Fiji’s diversion from the previously-agreed constitutional process, which had earlier been welcomed by CMAG and which had attracted widespread public engagement and confidence within Fiji.

7. CMAG called on the Government of Fiji to ensure that the steps now undertaken toward restoring constitutional democracy are credible and inclusive, and similarly enjoy the confidence and support of the people of Fiji, including:

a. a transparent and consultative process to achieve a constitution that accords with Commonwealth and internationally-accepted standards for democracy, good governance and the rule of law, and that genuinely enjoys the endorsement of the people of Fiji;

b. the restoration of the structures necessary for credible elections, including an independent Election Management Body;

c. the ability of political parties and candidates to contest elections freely under fair and consistent rules and on a level playing field;

d. withdrawal of the military from involvement in government; and

e. full respect for fundamental human rights and freedoms in accordance with international law and without undue restriction, including freedoms of speech, association and movement, and a free and independent media.

8. The Group expressed concern about ongoing restrictions on human rights and reports of human rights abuse in Fiji, and emphasised the necessity of full respect for human rights and the rule of law, to create the environment necessary for credible elections.

9. CMAG noted the visit to Fiji undertaken by the Pacific Islands Forum’s Ministerial Contact Group on 12 April 2013, and reaffirmed the Commonwealth’s commitment to continuing to work in co-operation with regional and international partners in relation to the Fiji situation.

10. CMAG encouraged the Commonwealth to remain engaged with Fiji in appropriate ways, including the Secretary-General’s ongoing engagement with the Government of Fiji and other stakeholders, also encompassing further exploration of options for the provision of assistance to Fiji in relation to democracy and the rule of law.

God bless Fiji

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Abduction Attempts In Fiji

There is an alarming increase in the number of abductions taking place in Fiji. Children are going missing on Viti Levu, with reports on Facebook telling of at least 12 children missing from the Sigatoka area alone. A young man reported to police that he had been drugged and abducted by an Asian and two Fijians in April.

What the heck is happening?

Under the illegal regime, the rule of law in Fiji has fallen away completely. That Savnish Kumar’s attackers were an Asian and two Fijians suggests this was a training exercise. The Asian teacher is showing our locals ‘how to’ commit a dire criminal act. He is training them up.

Is this the rise of a new criminal element – taking our children, our young, vulnerable, beautiful children for criminal intentions?

Or is this part of a cold, calculated strategy of the regime to take a leaf out of Indonesia’s playbook so they can make our prominent citizens ‘disappear’ like they do in West Papua?

The illegal regime MUST be stopped.

Tabu soro.

God bless Fiji.

Kill The Chicken To Frighten The Monkey

The entire Fijian community – within our islands and overseas – is still reeling in shock at the video which graphically captures the beating of Iowane Benedito, the alleged escaped prisoner.

Some on the blogs and social networks believe the clip has been leaked to the media. But could it be something even more sinister?

The regime is on the back foot. They know they are at an all-time popularity low. They know they can no longer hide behind their lies. They know their decrees aren’t worth the paper they are written on. They know that discontent is seething among We The People.

If you cast your mind back to December 2006, back when We The People still believed in our inalienable rights (before the illegal regime went ahead and ‘alien-ed’ them), there was quite a bit of discontent which was being publicly expressed. At least, it was being publicly expressed until the illegal regime detained at their barracks our most visible, respected and admired rights advocates – all women other than one young man – holding them without access to legal representation, and criminally assaulting them. They killed innocent young civilian men in custody. Before the coup, they had killed the CRW soldiers, also while in custody.

The shock, revulsion and outrage at that time was comparable to that we all feel today. How dare they?!

They dare, because this is yet another tactic used to effect by illegal regimes in other parts of the world.  In China, the tactic is referred to as ‘killing the chicken to frighten the monkey’. The regime knows they cannot lock us all up. So instead they visibly target a select few, commit grave atrocities, and let word of it be spread among the population. They don’t need us to be completely scared. They just need us to be scared enough to not take action, to not speak out, to not have the courage to stand up and say ‘NO MORE!’.

They are cowards. And their time has come. Do you really think they will let us have elections in 2014? We must take action NOW before our country is further ravaged by the rot. We need strikes and demonstrations, up and down the country. We need to show the world that this illegal regime does not have our mandate, our support nor our meek compliance. We need justice.

Tabu soro.

God bless Fiji.

Final Petition of William R Marshall

The Petition of the regime’s former Justice of Appeal has kept lawyers amused all day.

The only version currently online is in reverse order. If anyone has a copy in natural order, please send it through via Comments and it will be posted on this blog.

God bless Fiji

Bunkum evidence

So the military regime is “investigating” how Lt Col Mara escaped and who may have aided him. The figurative horse has already bolted from the stable – why spend so much time trying to figure out how the stable door came to be open?

The answer could lie in another case from the illegal regime’s deep, dark past. Coup 4.5 – ever on the ball – has unearthed interesting information about the conman, Peter Foster and his relationship with the illegal regime. It is evident that the regime spent a LOT of time using Foster’s testimony to legitimise their reasons for overthrowing the legitimately elected multi-party government.  All the information that Foster gave them was bunkum – poison fruit from a poison tree. But BainiVore, the malodorous Chodokant and their minions of the time quoted the information ad nauseum. Why? Because BainiVore needed to convince the Military Council that his plans were necessary. And through his lies, he managed to fool them.

So, this time, who is BainiVore trying to convince? What lies is he preparing the ground for, and for whose benefit – aside from his own? Does he need, once again, to pull the wool over the eyes of the Military Council? We know he wants to get rid of the Nailatikau’s. Perhaps he is trying to use Ului as red herring to achieve that.

Whatever his plans, we know that his intentions are evil. Members of the Military Council – DO NOT BE FOOLED! Get rid of him, strip him of his position, and take us back to free and fair elections. We are SO CLOSE to freedom now. Tabu soro.

God bless Fiji

Egypt’s parallels in Fiji

This article on Egypt’s upheaval by editor Christopher Hitchens in Conde Nast’s April edition of Vanity Fair has some stunning parallels to Fiji’s situation.

The day is coming when Fiji’s illegal interim military regime will fall. What we need in place is the interim government that will replace them, that We The People can get behind and support.

The goons are doing all they can to prevent an alternative administration forming (by dealing out lashings of beatings, etc) and to prevent We The People from voicing our protest (such as pressure on the organisers of the aborted 4 March rally).

There are two quotes from this excellent article, which appears on the page titled “Hitchens” (see top of the page), that stand out for Fiji’s situation. I paraphrase them here for Fiji.

Fiji is not a country with an army but an army that has a country.”

and

Bainimarama wants to be thought of as a father of our nation, only to discover that We The People want to be orphans.”

How long will we allow the illegal regime to make us their victims? How long will we allow them to rule us with our own fear?

You can read the full article online here http://www.vanityfair.com/politics/features/2011/04/hitchens-201104.

God bless Fiji

Vanity Fair is published by Conde Nast and is a darn good read

Hot Bread owner under threat

The illegal regime has blocked us from being able to read Michael Field’s blog. So, thanks to our internationally-based freedom activists, here is a transcript of his latest post.

Heat Over Hot Bread Owner

Fiji’s military are poised to seize Dr Mere Samisoni and  haul her up to the Queen Elizabeth Barracks, presumably for  re-education, Chinese Communist Party style.

I have been advised of this by a good source who is frankly alarmed over what might happen.

She is facing the same kind of treatment dished out to Sam Speight who was tortured at QEB over a DVD circulating. (click here to watch the videoes)

The military, who have somewhat shamefully taken the route of oppressing the Fijian people, are also working to close down Dr Samisoni’s Hot Bread Kitchen chain.

Some background

Back in the days I was allowed into Fiji and camped up at  the Holiday Inn, I used to have a early morning ritual.

I would walk up the road to the Hot Bread which, even at that early hour, was open. Customers would often be lining up buying fresh bread.

Not being much of a white bread man myself, I just limited myself to buying the daily newspapers. That was when they were independent, lively newspapers.

I knew Dr Samisoni owned the chain and I knew of her strong involvement with the ruling Soqosoqo Duavata ni Lewenivanua  (SDL). At some stage we even came to indirect blows. She  wrote a letter to the Fiji Times critical of something I wrote.

I cannot remember what the issue was. The thought, though, that I would boycott the Hot Bread Kitchen because we had a disagreement, simply did not enter my head.

Mature adults in civilised states can have disagreements.

And still break bread, so to speak.

Besides, the Hot Bread Kitchen struck me as a worthy enterprise by locals for locals. It has 400 locals working for it.

Recent developments

Dr Samisoni recently went to Lomaloma, her home village, on Vanua Balavu in Lau. She was setting up yet another Hot Bread – a daunting operation on those distant islands. She had a copy of a DVD that had been the source of trouble for Sam Speight. The DVDs were not produced by SDL. The original piece was sent from Suliasi Daunitutu who was the speaker in the DVD. Fiji Democratic Freedom Movement (FDFM) World Wide Chapters funded and produced the DVDs in Australia. Once the original arrived people dubbed their own. These can also be downloaded from youtube (click here to watch the videoes).

Dr Samisoni told her cousin, the Turaga Ni Koro, that he could look at it if he wanted to. Or not. Up to him. It is not known if he watched.

The military heard word of this, and now I hear she is targeted for re-education at the barracks.

Prices

Voreqe Bainimarama’s Price Incomes Board is also being used against her, with rules proposed on the price that can be charged for bread.

Now, at first blush, one can assume that setting a price for bread is a good thing. But in the case it is a military regime trying to stay in office. And as anybody who has followed recent UN Food and Agriculture Organisation  bulletins, the price of the ingredients needed to make bread  have internationally gone through the roof.

How can a military board set a price independent of the world price? Fiji, the way the world should be?

The military have revengeful method in their madness though, and they are using the Incomes Board to get at Dr Samisoni.

The big bakeries such as the Malaysian owned Morris Hedstrom and the small Chinese shops can use white bread as  a loss leader. That means they sell it at the board price, at no profit, but make it up on other produce.

Alert

If the military demands she comes to the barracks, she should call her solicitor as soon as Police or Army call or visit her. Further that she has a right to remain silent and she tell them that she will maintain that right to silence. Her solicitor can take over when he arrives there. Basically tell them, she will remain silent and they can charge her with an offence(s) or release her, they have burden of proof. It’s not her job to answer their questions and provide them with any evidence.

Fiji, lost now and little noticed in the world, might believe it is able to get away with the kind of oppressive action feared about to happen. Who cares, the Republic of the Fiji Military Forces might say, what happens to an indigenous businesswoman.

Well, here is a piece of news to those soldiers thinking of  doing it; you are being watched and you will be named.

At some stage in this whole mess, there has to be a reckoning.

27 March 2011

Michael Field http://www.michaelfield.org/hotbread.htm

God bless Fiji